Bob Costas On Washington Name Change

As the Washington NFL franchise announces its team name and logo will be retired, legendary broadcaster Bob Costas recalls his 2013 NBC Sunday Night Football commentary on why the... See More

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Bob Costas On Washington Name Change Bob Costas On Washington Name Change

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As the Washington NFL franchise announces its team name and logo will be retired, legendary broadcaster Bob Costas recalls his 2013 NBC Sunday Night Football commentary on why the nickname, by definition, is an insult. In this excerpt from a 2019 exchange with ESPN’s Bob Ley as part of the Seton Hall University College of Communication and the Arts’ Sports Media Speaker Series, co-sponsored by the Stillman School of Business, Costas also remembers broadcasting mentor and fellow Syracuse University alumnus Marty Glickman and explains why he carries a Mickey Mantle card wherever he goes.

As the Washington NFL franchise announces its team name and logo will be retired, legendary broadcaster Bob Costas recalls his 2013 NBC Sunday Night Football commentary on why the nickname, by definition, is an insult. In this excerpt from a 2019 exchange with ESPN’s Bob Ley as part of the Seton Hall University College of Communication and the Arts’ Sports Media Speaker Series, co-sponsored by the Stillman School of Business, Costas also remembers broadcasting mentor and fellow Syracuse University alumnus Marty Glickman and explains why he carries a Mickey Mantle card wherever he goes.

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Stu Hothem

Stu Hothem has covered some of the biggest events in sports across TV, radio and the web. As a researcher with ABC, CBS and ESPN, he worked on the Super Bowl, Olympics, World Cup and X Games. At FOXSports.com, he integrated content and interactive features with FOX Sports broadcast and cable programming. He managed the editorial team at NASCAR.com and also worked in the sanctioning body’s integrated marketing communications department. His professional career began at WFAN, the nation’s first all-sports radio station, following his time at the Rutgers radio station as a play-by-play announcer, talk-show host and general manager.